Roman Mosaic Patterns & Sound Waves

Lawrence Payne
2 min readSep 18, 2022

The following is an autogenerated translation from a Facebook post by Dālet Prosokè and reproduced with his permission.

A surprising discovery happened in the distant 2011 in which, for the first time, I realized the relationship between the geometric modules created by Pictor Imaginarius and the behavior of matter subjected to sound frequencies of varying intensity, observing the experiments carried out by the German musician and physicist Ernst Chladni, then recorded a long time later by the Swiss doctor Hans Jenny, who coined the term cimatic to define this phenomenon.

It’s not a coincidence that we have to remember that it was Pythagoras who intimated the relationship between music and mathematics, stating that “the geometry of shapes is solidified music”, and the very intimate meaning of the words “music” and “mosaic” is the only one that contains The etymology of the “Muses” king, consolidating perhaps this close relationship.

The physical phenomena involved in the formation of Chladni figures, even if they find an explanation in classical physics, open to the search for analogies between philosophical-religious insights and aspects of modern physics, identifying parallels f About the phenomena described by cymatics, the wave formulation of quantum physics, and the phenomena they bring to the formation of fractal structures

The search continues…

Details: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cimatica

In the pictures, analogies between the modules of two mute floor and the patterns generated by sound frequencies at 345 hz

Pavimento musivo che rappresenta il rapimento di Ganimede, II sec. d.C.
Domus di Sollertiana, El-Jem
Pattern generato da frequenze sonore a 345 hz
Mosaico pavimentale con uccelli, II sec. d.C. Palazzo Massimo alle Terme
Pattern generato da frequenze sonore a 345 hz

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Lawrence Payne

I help people create authentic copies of Roman mosaics even if they do not have any background in art or crafts.